Trust News

Our foundation trust's latest press releases and news stories. For media enquiries contact details can be found here www.bradfordhospitals.nhs.uk/contact-us/media

Headline Brief



Past Issues of FOCUS Magazine

Our foundation trust's latest press releases and news stories. For media enquiries contact details can be found here www.bradfordhospitals.nhs.uk/contact-us/media

Headline Brief



Past Issues of FOCUS Magazine

  • Bradford babies make their first appearance in exciting new BiBBS study

    over 1 year ago
    Bri newbulid 008
    One of the UK’s most exciting studies which aims to improve the life chances of babies and children has welcomed its first arrivals. Yesterday heralded the six month anniversary of the start of the Born in Bradford Better Start (BIBBS) project – which so far has seen 130 babies born after 328 mums and 51 partners were recruited into the study. Baby Jayson Adjandeh was born in May, and his parents Bernic and Juliana Adjandeh, were one of the first couples to sign up to the BIBBS study. Bernic and Juliana said: “We as a family are... Continue reading
    One of the UK’s most exciting studies which aims to improve the life chances of babies and children has welcomed its first arrivals. Yesterday heralded the six month anniversary of the start of the Born in Bradford Better Start (BIBBS) project – which so far has seen 130 babies born after 328 mums and 51 partners were recruited into the study. Baby Jayson Adjandeh was born in May, and his parents Bernic and Juliana Adjandeh, were one of the first couples to sign up to the BIBBS study. Bernic and Juliana said: “We as a family are happy to continue to support this research. Our participation in the Born in Bradford project is our small way of helping the team achieve their goals in helping the community.” The BiBBS study is being delivered by the Born in Bradford (BiB) team, set up 10 years ago to monitor the health of babies born across the Bradford district and follow them throughout their childhood. BiBBS is part of Better Start Bradford, a £49m partnership programme led by Bradford Trident in the Better Start Bradford areas of Bowling and Barkerend, Bradford Moor and Little Horton. Altogether, Better Start Bradford will be running over 20 different projects over the next 10 years to help give children in these areas the best start in life. BiB Director, Professor John Wright said: “Jayson is one of the first arrivals of over 5,000 babies in this ground-breaking new study. We want to make sure that every one of these children gets the very best start to life to fulfil their true potential. “Over the last 10 years BiB has shown how we can help improve our understanding of the complex causes of ill-health. “BiBBS will build on this knowledge to test innovative new approaches to improving the health of the next generation of children by developing better parents, healthier children and safer environments.” Better Start Bradford Innovation Hub, Programme Manager, Dr Josie Dickerson added: “The BiBBS team are really excited to celebrate the first babies born in our new birth cohort. “We would like all pregnant women and their partners who live in the Better Start Bradford areas to join this study and we look forward to welcoming many more pregnant women, their partners and their babies over the coming years.” Currently all pregnant women and their partners who live in the Better Start Bradford areas are being invited to join the study when they attend their glucose tolerance test appointment at Bradford Royal Infirmary at around 26 weeks into their pregnancy. In total, 5,000 pregnant women, their partners and their babies will join the BiBBS study over the next 5 years. BiBBS will then follow-up these babies and their parents to see how the Better Start Bradford projects affect children’s health and development as they grow up. In particular, Born in Bradford will look at the effects of the projects on children’s social and emotional development, their communication and language development and on nutrition and obesity. These findings will be used to improve services across the country to help children get a great start in life.
  • Award-winning Bradford project strikes gold!

    over 1 year ago
    Project search award

    A scheme to help Bradford students with learning difficulties find employment has collected a national award.

    Project SEARCH, which is based at Bradford Teaching Hospitals, helps students develop their skills by finding them work experience placements, as well as through classroom teaching.

    Now in its third year at the Foundation Trust, the scheme was presented with an award after achieving a 66.7 per cent success rate last year when six out of its nine interns went on to secure employment after completing the programme.

    The Foundation Trust’s Head of Equality and Diversity, Lorraine Cameron, along with co-ordinators, Ali Sholi and... Continue reading

    A scheme to help Bradford students with learning difficulties find employment has collected a national award.

    Project SEARCH, which is based at Bradford Teaching Hospitals, helps students develop their skills by finding them work experience placements, as well as through classroom teaching.

    Now in its third year at the Foundation Trust, the scheme was presented with an award after achieving a 66.7 per cent success rate last year when six out of its nine interns went on to secure employment after completing the programme.

    The Foundation Trust’s Head of Equality and Diversity, Lorraine Cameron, along with co-ordinators, Ali Sholi and Bryony Dolby travelled to Bath last week to attend the national Project Search conference.

    They were accompanied by the programme’s partners Southfield Special School in Little Horton, the national learning disability charity Hft, and Bradford District Council, as well as representatives Puddle Digital and the University of Bradford who, along with other local companies, are members of the project’s business advisory committee who support interns with work experience placements.

    Ms Cameron, who has acted as the Business Liaison Advisor since Project SEARCH’s inception in Bradford three years ago, said: “I am incredibly proud of the project and our students. In our first year, 40% of interns gained a job – that was good, but it wasn’t good enough because we want everyone to be successful in getting a job at the end of our programme.

    “It’s great to see the Bradford business community supporting our interns and helping them gain employment.

    “This award demonstrates the progress we have made with Project SEARCH and our Business Advisory Committee during our second year, when interns secured jobs at the likes of the University of Bradford and the Midland Hotel. With local businesses help, all interns who graduated last year and wanted a job, got a job, which is just fantastic.”

    Hft’s Regional Manager for Bradford and Bolton, Andrew Horner, added: “Hft is extremely proud to be part of Bradford Project SEARCH which is achieving such fantastic outcomes for the young adults who we support. This award recognises the amazing partnership working in Bradford which makes this initiative so successful.”

    Director of Human Resources and Organisational Development, Joanne Marshall, said: “The University of Bradford is extremely proud to be working in partnership with the Project Search team over the past 18 months, which has resulted in the creation of a number of placements and jobs for Project SEARCH interns at the University of Bradford.

    “We have a shared belief in the Project SEARCH approach, with leadership from the top in both organisations supporting the opportunity to create the right environment to maximise the potential of young people with learning disabilities in the employment setting. This award is a credit to all those involved from the different organisations. The project is a leading example of best practice in the recruitment of employees with learning disabilities within large employers working together to maximise the opportunities and break down barriers.”

    Puddle Digital founder and managing director, Steven Burles, stated: "I am delighted that Project Search Bradford has won this award. From speaking to other groups from across the UK at the recent European Conference, it does seem that Bradford is leading the way in terms of innovation and making year on year progress with their students.

    “I feel, in the months, to come that many more groups will be communicating with the Bradford team and using them as a benchmark for the future."

    Throughout their involvement in the project, instead of attending school, students spend their final year of education based at BRI on work experience internships. They have an opportunity to try out three different roles, each of which runs for ten weeks.

    On July 12 the third intake of Project SEARCH interns will graduate from Project SEARCH at a ceremony in the Bradford Royal Infirmary’s Sovereign Lecture Theatre.

    Next year, the city will also have the honour of hosting the Project SEARCH national conference which will take place at the University of Bradford from June 22-23.

  • Magnifique! Bradford hospital cyclists triumph for charity

    over 1 year ago
    London to paris poppy field

    Bradford Royal Infirmary staff are celebrating raising thousands of pounds for charity after saddling up for a gruelling 300-mile cycle ride.

    The ‘magnificent seven ’ who cycled from London to Paris in a bid to boost funds for Bradford Hospitals Children’s Charity were: Consultants Beccy Bardgett (Paediatrics), Sarah Jowett (Gastroenterology); Sue Calvert (Gynaecology); Cord Spilker (Neurology) and Farzana Khan (Emergency Medicine), along with Medical Secretary, Linda Lawson and Review Manager, Louise Clarkson.

    They were joined by members of their family and friends, who are supporters of the charity: Mark Christopher, Tim Robinson, Lincoln Jowett, Angelica Santiago, Deborah Hardy, James Simpson... Continue reading

    Bradford Royal Infirmary staff are celebrating raising thousands of pounds for charity after saddling up for a gruelling 300-mile cycle ride.

    The ‘magnificent seven ’ who cycled from London to Paris in a bid to boost funds for Bradford Hospitals Children’s Charity were: Consultants Beccy Bardgett (Paediatrics), Sarah Jowett (Gastroenterology); Sue Calvert (Gynaecology); Cord Spilker (Neurology) and Farzana Khan (Emergency Medicine), along with Medical Secretary, Linda Lawson and Review Manager, Louise Clarkson.

    They were joined by members of their family and friends, who are supporters of the charity: Mark Christopher, Tim Robinson, Lincoln Jowett, Angelica Santiago, Deborah Hardy, James Simpson and Kirsty Wild.

    The epic ride took four days, finishing under the shadow of the French capital’s famous landmark, the Eiffel Tower, and has raised more than £10,000 so far - with more money yet to come in.

    Together the sterling efforts of the ‘fabulous fourteen’ will make a huge difference to the babies, children and young people who become inpatients of BRI, part of Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust – as well as their families.

    The journey was not without a couple of glitches though with two cyclists involved in accidents along the way and suffering injuries.

    Unfortunately, on Day One, just before the cyclists reached Dover, Consultant for Emergency Medicine, Farzana Khan skidded, falling from her bike and cutting her forehead, which she ably patched up herself using Steri-Strips and her mobile phone as a mirror!

    She said: “We were at a fork in the road with a turn to the left and then an immediate turn to the right. Unfortunately, the call to turn right came a bit too late and I turned too sharply. Before I knew it, I was skidding on gravel and bouncing off my bike. I was a bit shaken but managed to carry on.”

    For Medical Secretary, Linda Lawson, the ride ended on Day Three, in the town of Compiegne, when she was involved in an unavoidable collision with another rider. It resulted in a fracture to her collarbone and cuts needing stitches. But happily she was able to be at the finishing line to cheer on her team-mates and she is now slowly recovering.

    Paediatric Consultant, Beccy Bardgett said: “It was a fantastic experience and we certainly had one or two challenges along the way; not least the unfortunate accidents and weather. On Day Two as we arrived in Calais, there was a level three weather warning issued with people being told to stay indoors. The roads were flooded and covered in mud and debris and there were lightning strikes too so the organisers changed our route to try and avoid it. This meant we had some miles to catch up on during Days Three and Four.

    “But everywhere we cycled the French were clapping and cheering us on and shouting ‘allez, allez’ (go, go.) At one point a French policeman in his car even encouraged us by calling out to us via the tannoy. And as we came up the Champs Elysees, the atmosphere was fantastic.

    “On behalf of the whole team, I would like to thank everyone for all the generous sponsorship and messages of support that we have received.”

    You can donate to Bradford Hospitals Children's on justgiving Donate now or Beccy’s dedicated page for the London to Paris is Donate now


  • New reception and patient assessment areas open at the Bradford Royal Infirmary’s Emergency Department

    over 1 year ago
    Ed reopening


    The next phase of a new £2m refurbishment of Bradford Royal Infirmary's Emergency Department (ED) has opened.

    A new reception, patient assessment and waiting areas, alongside a four-bed rapid assessment bay for ambulance admissions, were unveiled today.

    Work on the refurbishment project started in November and is being completed in four phases with a current finish date of this autumn.

    The renovation project is part of an ambitious vision to create a more efficient acute medicine service for the people of Bradford.

    Clinical lead for urgent care, Dr Sue King, said: "The new BRI ED has been designed with both... Continue reading


    The next phase of a new £2m refurbishment of Bradford Royal Infirmary's Emergency Department (ED) has opened.

    A new reception, patient assessment and waiting areas, alongside a four-bed rapid assessment bay for ambulance admissions, were unveiled today.

    Work on the refurbishment project started in November and is being completed in four phases with a current finish date of this autumn.

    The renovation project is part of an ambitious vision to create a more efficient acute medicine service for the people of Bradford.

    Clinical lead for urgent care, Dr Sue King, said: "The new BRI ED has been designed with both patients and quality at its core and it’s great to see the new internal space opening up.

    “All our new interiors are ‘dementia-friendly and the addition of natural daylight into the unit will greatly improve the environment for our staff and hopefully the experience of our patients.

    “People will also benefit from our new assessment areas which sit alongside our reception.

    The benefits of having an earlier, more comprehensive assessment where everyone works together, from the senior medic to the ambulance paramedics and our triage team, should provide a smoother patient journey in the department and onwards into our hospitals. This renovation ensures that we remain at the forefront of emergency medicine practice nationally."

    Numbers using the city’s ED have risen over the years and today, on average, between 370 and 400 people are being treated there daily.

    The first phase of the refurbishment project saw the creation of a new administration extension block to the area between ED and the old radiology department building, facing on to Duckworth Lane.

    The next phase of the building work will see contractors create a new self-contained Paediatric ED in the area which formerly housed the old reception and patient waiting area.

    The new unit is due for completion in November and will contain separate waiting and assessment areas, two new high dependency cubicles and a larger clinical work space.

    Builders will also construct a separate waiting area where all patients will go to wait for their results.

    Directorate Manager for Urgent Care, Ann Bannister, said: "This is an exciting time for urgent and emergency care as the creation of the new ED will lead to an enhanced experience for patients who need our services at what can be a very traumatic time in their lives.

    “This latest section of the project has been the most disruptive part of the build and I would thank everyone – from patients to staff – for their patience.

    “I hope they will agree with me when I say that I think we have the start of a fantastic new facility for the people of Bradford.”


  • £2m investment in Bradford Royal Infirmary’s Emergency Department

    over 1 year ago
    Ae bradford royal infirmary


    A £2m refurbishment of Bradford Royal Infirmary’s Emergency Department (ED) is currently underway as part of an ambitious vision to create a more efficient acute medicine service for the people of Bradford.

    Work started on the project in November and will be completed in four phases with a current finish date of this autumn.

    ED clinical lead, Dave Greenhorn, said: “The new ED is designed with both patient safety and high quality at its core.

    “Over the last decade, the increase in patients attending A&E has been unprecedented and the department is no longer big enough to cope with the... Continue reading


    A £2m refurbishment of Bradford Royal Infirmary’s Emergency Department (ED) is currently underway as part of an ambitious vision to create a more efficient acute medicine service for the people of Bradford.

    Work started on the project in November and will be completed in four phases with a current finish date of this autumn.

    ED clinical lead, Dave Greenhorn, said: “The new ED is designed with both patient safety and high quality at its core.

    “Over the last decade, the increase in patients attending A&E has been unprecedented and the department is no longer big enough to cope with the volume we see coming through our doors. Patients are living longer and have more complex medical needs today compared to two decades ago.

    “The new ED has been designed to provide a slicker and more efficient service, with faster senior clinician involvement at an early stage in the patient pathway. This will ensure that we remain at the forefront of emergency medicine practice nationally.”

    When the department was redesigned in 2000, it was predicted that around 70,000 patients a year (which were the projected figures at the time) would use the service. But now between 135-140,000 people attend annually.

    The first phase to create a new administration extension block is ongoing in the area between ED and the old radiology department building, facing on to Duckworth Lane.

    The next phase sees contractors move inside the hospital to create a new reception, waiting areas and a rapid assessment area. This work is due to begin in April.

    A new self-contained Paediatric ED will also be constructed internally before the creation of a separate waiting area where patients will go to wait for their results.

    Directorate Manager for Urgent Care, Ann Bannister, said: “This is an exciting time for urgent and emergency care which will see an enhanced pathway for patients who attend our accident and emergency department.”
    The Foundation Trust opened a new acute medicine wing on ward 1 last year and new link wards between it and ward 4 were completed in December. This brings together all three areas to form a new acute medical assessment area.

    This was in addition to a new ambulatory care unit which opened last May and involved a full redevelopment of former office accommodation at a cost of £750,000.

    A ward 4 refurbishment project, which is due to get underway in April, is scheduled to be completed by August and will see a further £700,000 invested in acute medicine.

  • Cervical Cancer Prevention Week

    over 1 year ago
    Cervical cancer


    Hospital specialists in the city are reminding women not to be complacent about their health during this week’s national Cervical Cancer Prevention Week.

    Every day in the UK, eight women are diagnosed with cervical cancer and three women will lose their lives to the disease.

    Cervical cancer is largely preventable thanks to cervical screening and the HPV vaccination programme – yet uptake of cervical screening is now going down year on year. Recent research has shown that the percentage of women aged 25 to 64 within the Bradford City CCG accessing cervical screening programmes was 62.5 per... Continue reading


    Hospital specialists in the city are reminding women not to be complacent about their health during this week’s national Cervical Cancer Prevention Week.

    Every day in the UK, eight women are diagnosed with cervical cancer and three women will lose their lives to the disease.

    Cervical cancer is largely preventable thanks to cervical screening and the HPV vaccination programme – yet uptake of cervical screening is now going down year on year. Recent research has shown that the percentage of women aged 25 to 64 within the Bradford City CCG accessing cervical screening programmes was 62.5 per cent, lower than the national average of 74.3 percent.

    “Early detection is key to increasing survival rates and educating everyone on the disease, its symptoms and ways to prevent it,” said Suzanne Taylor, nurse colposcopist at Bradford Teaching Hospitals. “It’s vital that women attend their routine smear test invitations and don’t ignore their appointment as this test can help reduce your risk of cervical cancer.

    “Cervical Cancer Prevention Week provides us with an opportunity to remind women that they need to take care and listen to their bodies.”

    The focus of this year’s awareness week is to remind women of cervical cancer symptoms and causes of the disease, as well as ways to prevent it.

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women aged 35 or under.

    In the majority of cases, the disease is caused by a persistent infection with a virus called human papillomavirus (HPV) which causes damage to the cervical cells. HPV is a common virus transmitted through skin to skin contact in the genital area.

    Symptoms of cervical cancer are not always obvious at first and there are sometimes no symptoms with early stage cervical cancer. There are however recognised symptoms associated with the disease, such as unusual bleeding during or after sexual intercourse, inter-menstrual bleeding and persistent, unpleasant or unusual vaginal discharge.

    Suzanne added: “Cervical screening, available to all women aged between 25 and 64, is a key method of preventing cervical cancer as it detects any early abnormalities on the cervix which if left untreated could lead to cancer.

    “The highest incidence of cervical cancer occurring is in women aged between 30 and 39. Cervical screening is a simple and painless procedure and with early detection and treatment, it is estimated to prevent up to 75 per cent of cervical cancers.

    “We urge women to book an appointment with their GP as soon as they receive their reminder or to contact their GP if they think their screening is due or if they are experiencing any of the symptoms listed above.

    “If you are diagnosed early, the outlook will usually be very good and a complete cure is often possible. It is so important for women to listen to their bodies, report anything suspicious and attend their screening appointments every three years.”

    Suzanne is currently undertaking joint work with the Shipley-based ARCH (Advice, Rehabilitation, Counselling and Health) charity.

    This Friday (29 January) she will join the charity at a special event at Shipley Town Hall designed to raise awareness of the NHS’s national cervical screening programme which encourages women to improve their health outcomes by attending their three-yearly smear tests.

    Suzanne added: “It’s great to be working in collaboration with other agencies to improve the health outcomes of the women of Bradford.”

    Bradford Teaching Hospitals, Bradford Council, Public Health England and Bradford NHS clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) are currently working on joint projects to increase cervical screening uptake across the district.

    For more information on cervical cancer, visit www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Cancer-of-the-cervix/Pages/Introduction.aspx or Jo’s Trust at http://www.jostrust.org.uk/

  • Dietitians encourage Bradford public to eat well

    almost 2 years ago
    Bradforddieticians



    The public can learn about eating well this winter during an event in Bradford city centre.

    Dietitians from Bradford Teaching Hospitals’ Nutrition and Dietetic Service will be at the Good Food Advice Stall in the entrance of Oastler Market, John Street, on Friday, 27 November between 9.30am and noon.

    Please come down and meet the team if you would like to receive more information on eating well this winter or to speak with a dietitian who can provide recipe tips and ideas on staying healthy.

    Pictured are the Foundation Trust's senior dietitians.



    The public can learn about eating well this winter during an event in Bradford city centre.

    Dietitians from Bradford Teaching Hospitals’ Nutrition and Dietetic Service will be at the Good Food Advice Stall in the entrance of Oastler Market, John Street, on Friday, 27 November between 9.30am and noon.

    Please come down and meet the team if you would like to receive more information on eating well this winter or to speak with a dietitian who can provide recipe tips and ideas on staying healthy.

    Pictured are the Foundation Trust's senior dietitians.

  • Launch of new community midwifery service in Bradford.

    about 2 years ago
    Better start bradford


    This month sees the launch of a new midwife-led project which aims to provide personalised, one-to-one maternity care to women living in some of the poorest areas of Bradford.

    Around 400 women living in Bowling, Barkerend, Bradford Moor and Little Horton will benefit from the new community partnership between Bradford Teaching Hospitals and Bradford Trident, who are leading the Better Start Bradford (BSB) £49million Big Lottery Fund programme which aims to help parents give their children the best start in life.

    Head of midwifery, Julie Walker, said: “Our new three-year pilot programme will focus on offering enhanced antenatal and postnatal... Continue reading


    This month sees the launch of a new midwife-led project which aims to provide personalised, one-to-one maternity care to women living in some of the poorest areas of Bradford.

    Around 400 women living in Bowling, Barkerend, Bradford Moor and Little Horton will benefit from the new community partnership between Bradford Teaching Hospitals and Bradford Trident, who are leading the Better Start Bradford (BSB) £49million Big Lottery Fund programme which aims to help parents give their children the best start in life.

    Head of midwifery, Julie Walker, said: “Our new three-year pilot programme will focus on offering enhanced antenatal and postnatal care with an emphasis on women knowing their named midwife.
    “Our seven community midwives and maternity support worker will offer the very best, gold standard, one-to-one service out in the community.

    “The women will benefit from a more individualised and tailored approach as our midwives will have smaller caseloads, enabling the woman to have longer appointments and be seen in venues which they tell us are more accessible for them. This scheme will ensure our team provides a greater and more in-depth continuity and co-ordination of care.”

    Where woman have multiple hospital appointments, the named midwife will help organise these to provide more synchronised care. The same midwife will also help women to plan for the place and type of birth of the woman’s choice.

    The new partnership also aims to address the social and emotional needs of families and babies, enhance the development of language and communication skills, support new mums in breastfeeding and in learning about the nutritional requirements of babies and toddlers.

    Michaela Howell, programme director for BSB, said: “Part of what BSB is about is supporting innovative ideas and new ways of working.

    “This is our third project to ‘go live’ and we will be looking forward to seeing how it improves womens’ experience of pregnancy and birth and the outcomes for their babies.”

    The programme will be evaluated throughout its three-year period and healthcare staff hope to see a number of improved outcomes, including increased satisfaction, earlier engagement with maternity services, an increase in the number of women having home births, a decrease in pre-term births and low birth weight babies, reduced rates of smoking and an increase in breastfeeding rates.

    “Throughout this new pilot, we hope that ongoing evaluations will help shape and develop our future midwifery service provision for all women and their babies within Bradford” added Mrs Walker.

    The pilot will initially involve all pregnant women registered with GP practices at Woodroyd Centre, Hillside Bridge and three surgeries at Barkerend Health Centre.

  • Health Passport issued to District’s Young People

    about 2 years ago
    70418 022

    It’s destination Bradford City Football Club on the 15th October as local NHS health providers, commissioners and the voluntary sector, team up to help young people on their health care journey. Your Future, Your Health is a free one day event, expected to welcome 500 young visitors.

    On the day, each young person will receive a Health passport and be challenged to collect ‘info zone’ stamps from a range of info zones. In each zone experts from Airedale and Bradford Hospitals, Bradford District Care Trust’s community health teams, the Bradford, Airedale, Wharfedale and Craven clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), Yorkshire Ambulance... Continue reading

    It’s destination Bradford City Football Club on the 15th October as local NHS health providers, commissioners and the voluntary sector, team up to help young people on their health care journey. Your Future, Your Health is a free one day event, expected to welcome 500 young visitors.

    On the day, each young person will receive a Health passport and be challenged to collect ‘info zone’ stamps from a range of info zones. In each zone experts from Airedale and Bradford Hospitals, Bradford District Care Trust’s community health teams, the Bradford, Airedale, Wharfedale and Craven clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), Yorkshire Ambulance Service, Barnardo’s and the Bradford Youth Development Partnership will be on hand to offer tips and advice. Zones include: Careers, Let’s Keep Healthy, Let’s Get Involved, and Let’s Stay Active and tackle issues such as emotional health and wellbeing, sexual health and relationships, drugs awareness, the effects of smoking and drinking and NHS careers. There will be CPR demos, and games taking place and rap and graffiti artists on hand to develop works based on young people’s views of healthcare.

    Top bosses from across local NHS services will take part in two ‘Question Time’ panels. Young people will have the opportunity to talk directly with the Chief Executives and Chairs of the District’s main healthcare organisations about their health and well-being priorities and what they would focus on if they were in charge.

    Paul Hogg, Project Lead said: “We wanted to give young people an opportunity to voice their opinions on healthcare and have access to credible advice on issues that may affect them. Some young people will leave thinking about a career in the NHS, or about becoming a volunteer or trust member. Others will leave with free, confidential advice to help them stay active, healthy and safe. It’s the first ever joint event of its kind locally, so as partners we’ll be interested in the feedback we receive. Our goal is to get young people actively involved in their own healthy futures. “

    The local CCGs: NHS Airedale, Wharfedale and Craven, NHS Bradford City, and NHS Bradford Districts are keen to use the event to get young people interested and involved in shaping local health services.

    Max Mclean, lay member for patient and public involvement at Bradford City CCG: “Bradford will be the youngest city in Europe in five years, so engaging and involving young people is a real priority for us. This is a great opportunity for us all to understand young people’s views on health services in the district, and we really hope they’ll continue to share their experiences and ideas after the event.”

    Your Future, Your Health is open to young people aged between 14 and 18 from Bradford, Airedale, Wharfedale and Craven. Invitations have been sent to local schools and colleges and through some child related health services. Places are free, but need to be booked in advance. If you’d like further information on attending please call: 01274 228293 or email debbie.daniel@bdct.nhs.uk
  • Diabetes Awareness Week

    about 2 years ago
    Diabetes awareness



    Bradford Teaching Hospitals is encouraging local people with diabetes to TALK Hypos throughout Hypo Awareness Week which runs from October 5-11.

    The locally endorsed, national campaign encourages patients and their health teams to discuss hypoglycaemia or 'hypos,' as they are often referred to, because they are one of the most common complications of diabetes.

    This year, health professionals at the Bradford Royal Infirmary and St Luke's Hospital are putting increased focus on spreading the 'hypo' message.

    Andrea Lealman, diabetes specialist nurse, said: "We want to raise the profile of diabetes and especially hypoglycaemia and its prevention throughout our hospitals.



    Bradford Teaching Hospitals is encouraging local people with diabetes to TALK Hypos throughout Hypo Awareness Week which runs from October 5-11.

    The locally endorsed, national campaign encourages patients and their health teams to discuss hypoglycaemia or 'hypos,' as they are often referred to, because they are one of the most common complications of diabetes.

    This year, health professionals at the Bradford Royal Infirmary and St Luke's Hospital are putting increased focus on spreading the 'hypo' message.

    Andrea Lealman, diabetes specialist nurse, said: "We want to raise the profile of diabetes and especially hypoglycaemia and its prevention throughout our hospitals.

    "Our aim is to increase awareness of diabetes in not just our patients, but also our medical and nursing staff, and give them the information which will help them recognise and treat the condition.
    "Hypo Awareness Week provides the perfect opportunity for us to be a part of a national campaign to help raise awareness and improve the wellbeing of people with diabetes."

    Findings of a survey being released to coincide with Hypo Awareness Week found that night-time hypos are common with approximately two-thirds (66%) of people having experienced a night-time hypo in the month prior to the survey.2 Despite this, one third (32%) fail to report their night-time hypos to their doctor or nurse. Encouragingly, the survey found that of those who did report, one third (34%) felt more confident about managing their night-time hypos.

    Hypos occur when glucose in the blood falls to a low level, and symptoms can include a pounding heart, trembling, hunger, difficulty concentrating and blurred vision. Symptoms of night-time hypos include waking up with a morning headache, night sweats and extreme tiredness. Night-time hypos can be of particular concern as they can be unpredictable and hard to detect.

    Night-time hypos have a significant impact on the lives of people living with diabetes and the survey showed that they can lead to absenteeism from work (21%), a loss of productivity at work (12%) and a reduced desire to socialise (13%) and exercise (12%).1 Almost half of people (47%) reported that their sleep had been affected by night-time hypos, and one quarter (25%) of people are scared of being alone when experiencing a night-time hypo.

    Simon O'Neill, Director of Health Intelligence for Diabetes UK, said, "We encourage all people with diabetes to remember the simple TALK Hypos message and to take steps to better manage their day and night-time hypos. These steps can include simple changes to lifestyle, diet and treatment so it is very important to discuss hypos as part of the regular consultation with your doctor or nurse."

    TALK Hypos is an acronym to encourage people with diabetes to discuss hypos with their doctor or nurse:
    * THINK: Do you know what a hypo is? Do you suffer from hypos?
    * ASK: your doctor or nurse about hypos and discuss them as part of your consultation
    * LEARN: what can be done to better manage your hypos, including lifestyle and treatment options
    * KEEP: track of your hypos for discussion with your healthcare professional

    During next week's Hypo Awareness Week, Foundation Trust staff will be putting up new diabetes posters and patient information, as well as encouraging staff and patients to talk about diabetes. From Tuesday lunchtime, staff will also be on hand to discuss the condition at an information stand in the main foyer of the Bradford Royal Infirmary.